springwise:

In Japan, train station allotments let commuters garden on the move

Rooftop gardens are not only a solution to enabling space-scarce cities to create produce locally, but — when combined with specific venues — can be especially convenient, such as Dakboerin‘s farms atop restaurant kitchens in the Netherlands. Now Japan’s Soradofarm scheme is placing allotments on top of train stations, to allow commuters to more seamlessly fit growing their own vegetables into their busy lifestyles. READ MORE…

2014

Back from Korea, and back to work & home for the last month. Korea has been a blast, and I constantly crave to return. CNY has come and gone, and I am both happy and tremulous that it is over, for yet another year. I feel I’m in the middle of a quarter-life crisis, and I must still see this life to completion. What is life, and what of me?

To life.

Just bboyed with Lazzie earlier this evening, and I feel exultant. Inexplicably, abruptly, after many months of not touching or even thinking about bboy, it feels right. (Disclaimer: I am still very much a beginner) It may be also the strong cup of tea I had in the afternoon.. Heart is still very much pumping like I’m having a panic attack.

Separately, it’s 3 more days to Korea. The closer I get to departure, the more nervous I am. It’d be my first time in winter real-time, and I’m worried of literally freezing to death. Other than that, Korea marks the end of school (!!!), and the beginning of a new adventure. I. Can’t. Wait.

So, this is what I’ve been missing the last 2 years. Freedom.

I’m lovin’ it. 

instagram:

Exploring Middle Earth on Instagram

To see more photos and videos from Hobbiton, explore the Middle Earth location page.

Ever since English author J.R.R. Tolkien first published his fantasy novel, The Hobbit, in 1937, readers around the world have been enchanted by the sprawling landscapes of Middle Earth. Nearly seventy years later in 2001, director Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings film series brought Tolkien’s world to life on the silver screen. With much of the film shot in New Zealand, the country has come to be known as the “Home of Middle Earth.”

Over 250 locations throughout New Zealand were used in the production of the films, taking full advantage of the diversity in the country’s landscape. From expansive fields and lush farmlands to snow-capped mountains, New Zealand’s features opened ample opportunities to make Middle Earth real.

With the release of The Hobbit film series, the sets from Hobbiton—home of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins—have been reconstructed and are open to tourists. Instagrammers from around the world have come to explore and share photos and videos from their time in Tolkien’s world.

Wanna stay where Baggins stayed